By Dean Larson

Photos: Seller, BringaTrailer.com

Everyone has something they own that’s worn in just right. Maybe it’s a leather jacket, a pair of shoes or your favorite chair. Whether it’s the flaws that come with use or the well-aged character, it just makes those things a bit more comfortable. And without a doubt, that feeling translates to a classic car in all the same ways. And while this Kirkham Cobra was constructed in 2005 instead of 1965, it’s worn-in just right, and inspires you to just jump in and go for a drive.

Maybe it’s the car, or maybe it’s the photographer, but either way I’m sold on this aluminum-bodied Kirkham roadster. The car is far from perfect, and some potential buyers will probably be turned off by its flaws. The nose of the car is dented up from an incident with a lift, the aluminum body is reported to have some filler, and the car has received recent paintwork to correct scratches and dings. Furthermore, there are a few caps and exterior details missing, the side pipes are a little crude, and the car generally shows signs of use throughout. And since the odometer shows only 1,470 miles, we’re left to assume most of this use occurred on the racetrack, as evidenced in the photo gallery.

While conventional wisdom dictates that a car like this should be meticulously maintained, shown, and driven rarely, there’s something spectacular about the idea of driving this Cobra as much as possible. For me it conjures up black and white images of charismatic individuals like Steve McQueen daily driving his Jaguar XKSS.

Fanciful daydreams aside, this is a pretty spectacular car that will still fetch good money (as any aluminum-bodied Cobra would). The car was originally spec’d with a polished aluminum finish, before being painted red in 2010. Halibrand wheels with Goodyear Eagle tires complete the image of a well-executed Shelby.

Also worth mention is the genuine big block under the hood. A period-correct, 1966 date-coded 427 side-oiler engine provides this car with all the horsepower and nostalgia a buyer could need. It’s probably also worth a few bragging points at Cobra meets as well. The seller reports that the engine was modified to run on pump gas 150 miles ago. Handling gear shifts is a Ford Toploader transmission, an appropriate choice for a period-correct driveline. Other than the date code, no other information is given about the engine. But whatever the configuration, you’re looking at at least 400 hp here.

So the million-dollar question is what’s it worth? And with this being an online auction on BringaTrailer.com, we’re guessing the number is right around $100,000.